858 Boul Maloney E,
Gatineau, QC J8P 1H1

The Academic Solution

 Elementary SCHOOL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

CADO follows the program prescribed by the Ministry of Education and Higher Education (MEES) both at elementary and secondary school levels. Since we work directly with the Ministry, we do not depend on any school board.

Below is the list of courses for elementary school students and the end of cycle outcomes as specified in the Québec Education Program for Preschool and Elementary Education (http://www.education.gouv.qc.ca/enseignants/pfeq/).

Preschool 4-year-olds
Child Development End of program outcomes
Physical and Motor Development

As outlined in the Ministry's Preschool Program, students develop cognitive, language, social, emotional, motor and physical skills through educational games. Teachers can then observe their students and organize activities that will help them improve their skills.

Emotional Development
Social Development
Language Development
Cognitive Development

 

Preschool 5-year-olds
Child Development End of program outcomes
Interact in a harmonious way

As outlined in the Ministry's Preschool Program, students develop different skills: interaction, communication, sensory and motor action, completing a project, building their understanding of the world and self-assertion. Teachers can observe and monitor their students’ progress and help them develop their potential.

Communicate
Assert oneself
Work at the sensory and motor level
Complete a project
Build his/her understanding of the world

 

Elementary Cycle one
Compulsory Subjects
Language
French, language of instruction

Competency 1 (read various texts)

"At the end of cycle one, students are capable of reading illustrated common and literary short texts having accessible content, structure, syntax and vocabulary. They can identify most of the explicit information contained in one or more short texts to meet different reading intentions. Students use the strategies they have learned to understand the texts they read. Building mainly on their own personal experiences, they react spontaneously to texts through speech, drawing, non-verbal language and sometimes writing."
 

Competency 2 (writing various texts)

"At the end of cycle one, students write a variety of short texts to meet basic needs that are reflected in their personal and academic lives. This way, they can write simple-structured prose texts that include ideas related to the subject matter. Their sentences are generally well-constructed, using a capital letter and a period. They have a concrete and common vocabulary. Moreover, they spell most of the words learned in class correctly. In the most straightforward cases, they match the determinants with the nouns by using the appropriate feminine and plural marks. Throughout their writing practice and with the help of their teacher, they use the strategies they have learned. They have a legible handwriting in most situations so that others can easily understand them."

Competency 3: Communicate orally

"At the end of cycle one, students often express themselves in classroom discussions and respect the established rules of communication. In different situations, they verbally investigate familiar topics with their peers. Most of the time, their reactions reflect appropriate listening and when they share their thoughts, they state their ideas clearly and use a simple and correct vocabulary. When required, they articulate clearly and adjust the volume of their voice. They are aware of different language registers and occasionally try to adapt their way of speaking to the people they are talking to and the situation."

English as a second language

Competency 1: To act on understanding of texts

“By the end of Elementary Cycle One, students have developed an ear for the rhythmicality of the English language through the songs, rhymes and stories they have worked on orally in class. Supported by the teacher and appropriate visual support, students identify orally familiar key elements and main events of texts.

With the help of various media featuring authentic audio models, students perform familiar songs and rhymes with their group, saying most of the lyrics and using appropriate gestures. Guided by the teacher and aided by resources illustrating key elements, students retell stories with their group: they identify the main characters, utter recurrent passages, sequence events, and verbalize parts of the stories. Guided by the teacher, students create personalized versions of texts with classmates. With the support of explicit modelling and the help of templates, students replace elements of songs, rhymes and stories with familiar language items of their choice, selected from the resources provided. Students support their texts with drawings, clippings, realia, or other means. Supported by the teacher, students use the strategies directed attention, physical response, practice, using resources effectively in appropriate situations. Guided by the teacher, they make good use of the strategies self-monitoring and self-evaluation.”

Competency 2: To communicate orally in English“By the end of Elementary Cycle One, through continuous exposure to an all-English environment, students have acquired an overall understanding of the language commonly used in the classroom. They respond appropriately in familiar situations. Supported by the teacher, students participate orally in classroom life using only English. They draw upon their personal language repertoire to transmit simple messages as they respond verbally, express needs and communicate ideas spontaneously, using words, strings of words and short expressions. Supported by the teacher, students use the strategies directed attention, risk-taking, physical response, gesture, asking for help effectively, in appropriate situations. Guided by the teacher, they make good use of the strategies self-monitoring and self- evaluation.

Domaine de la mathématique, de la science et de la technologie
Mathematics

Competency 1: To solve a situational problem related to mathematics

"By the end of this cycle, the students solve a situational problem based on complete information. They determine the task to be performed and find the relevant information by using different types of representations such as
objects, drawings, tables, graphs, symbols or words. They work out a solution involving one or two steps and occasionally check the result. Using basic mathematical language, they explain their solution (procedure and final
answer) orally or in writing."

Competency 2: To reason using mathematical concepts and processes

"By the end of this cycle, the students devise and apply their own processes to do mental and written computations that involve adding and subtracting natural numbers. They construct plane figures and solids and measure lengths and time using appropriate instruments and technology."

Science and Technology

Competency: To explore the world of Science and Technology

"Students are able to formulate questions and propose explanations concerning various phenomena related to their immediate environment. They conduct simple experiments to answer a question or solve a problem. They can distinguish between the natural world and man-made objects. They understand the workings of simple objects that are relatively easy to handle. They spontaneously use elements of scientific and technological languages to formulate questions, propose explanations, explain ways of doing things, describe objects and explain how they work."

Social Sciences
Geography, History and Citizenship Education

Competency: To construct his/her representation of space, time and society

"By the end of Cycle One, students use the appropriate tools to orient themselves in space and time. They refer to events in everyday life. They describe the characteristics of a group from here or elsewhere, the past or the present. They describe the elements of a place and some similarities, differences and changes. In doing so, they use correct vocabulary."

Arts Education
Visual Arts

Competency 1: To produce individual works in the visual arts

"By the end of Cycle One, the students participate in the steps of the creative process. Their productions are often influenced by emotional interests. Related to the stimulus for creation, the work conveys a personal perception of reality. It grows out of spontaneous gestures, an appropriate use of visual arts language and a simple organization of its components. The students are able to talk about aspects of their creative experience that are meaningful to them."

Competency 2: To produce media works in the visual arts

"By the end of Cycle One, the students participate in the steps of the creative process. Their productions are often influenced by emotional interests. Related to the stimulus for creation, the work conveys a personal view of reality and is addressed to one or more intended viewers. It grows out of spontaneous gestures, an appropriate use of visual arts language and a simple organization of its elements. The students are able to talk about aspects of creating a media work that are meaningful to them."

Competency 3: To appreciate works of arts, traditional artistic objects, media images, personal productions and those of classmates

"By the end of Cycle One, the students’ appreciation is often influenced by emotional interests. Using the subject-specific vocabulary, they identify elements of content in the production, work of art, traditional artistic object or media image. Their comments reflect their opinions about what they noticed and felt. They are able to talk about aspects of their appreciation experience that are meaningful to them."

Drama

Competency 1: To invent short scenes

"By the end of Cycle One, the students participate in the steps of the creative process. Their productions are often influenced by emotional interests. Related to the stimulus for creation, the short scene presents a simple story and highlights a few features of a character. It reveals a simple organization of its components. The students are able to talk about aspects of their creative experience that are meaningful to them."

Competency 2: To interpret short scenes

"By the end of Cycle One, the students interpret through gestures, sounds and words. Their interpretations show a certain accuracy in relation to the selected text. The students respect a few features of a character and demonstrate a basic level of control of performance techniques, styles of theatre, elements of drama and appropriate structures. Finally, the expressive nature of their interpretation is often coloured by emotional interests. They are able to talk about aspects of their interpretation experience that are meaningful to them."

Competency 3: To appreciate dramatic works, personal productions and those of classmates

"By the end of Cycle One, the students’ appreciation is often influenced by emotional interests. Using the subject-specific vocabulary, they identify elements of content in the production or theatrical work. Their comments reflect their opinions about what they have noticed and felt. They are able to talk about aspects of their appreciation experience that are meaningful to them."

Personal Development
Ethics and Religious Culture 

Competency 1: To reflect on ethical questions

“By the end of Cycle One, students are able to tackle a situation dealing with the needs of humans and other living beings, as well as the demands associated with interdependence. They can describe a situation by naming some essential elements. They can indicate the responsibilities that human beings have toward other living beings. They can express some elements of their reflection on the ethical question raised by the situation by responding to the teacher's questions. They can find similarities and differences between their perception and that of their classmates. They can name one or two references contained in a point of view. They can identify a value named by the teacher and recognize a norm that guides the way human beings act in a given situation. They are able to give special weight to an option or an action that favours the well-being of living beings by taking their connections of interdependence into account. They can say what they have learned.”

Competency 2: To demonstrate an understanding of the phenomenon of religion

“By the end of Cycle One, students are able to name different religious celebrations—celebrations or rituals associated with birth. They can recognize some forms of religious expression related to a celebration. They can understand that there are different ways of celebrating. They can associate a celebration with a religious tradition. They can relate the celebration to certain short stories and key figures. They can associate forms of religious expression with elements in their immediate environment. Through simple situations, they can name behaviours that are appropriate with regard to diversity. They are able to name what they have learned regarding forms of religious expression.”

Competency 3: To engage in dialogue
“By the end of Cycle One, students are able to follow a process and express their ideas in the context of a narration, conversation, discussion and deliberation. They can express their preferences, feelings or ideas about concrete and simple subjects. They can recognize the judgments of preference and prescription in a point of view. They can examine points of view using suggested paths. They respect some of the proposed rules of dialogue. They use the teacher's resources and suggestions to develop a relevant point of view. They can listen to others' points of view and are able to express whether their own view has been modified or consolidated.”

Physical Education and Health

Competency 1: To perform movement skills in different physical activity settings.

“Students identify possible movement skills in light of the instructions given, the goal pursued and the physical environment. They choose movement skills and justify their choices. They perform sequences of locomotor, nonlocomotor and object manipulation skills. They evaluate their process on the basis of their achievements and difficulties”

Competency 2: To interact with others in different physical activity settings
« L’élève planifie avec un autre élève des stratégies de coopération en fonction des rôles à jouer, des contraintes de l’environnement physique et du but visé. Il explique les règles d’éthique relatives à la tâche. Il applique les stratégies élaborées et les règles d’éthique. Il évalue avec son partenaire sa démarche à partir de ses réussites et de ses difficultés. »

Competency 3: To adopt a healthy, active lifestyle

“Students explain the concept of lifestyle habits and health. They try different types of physical activities, varying their duration and intensity. They evaluate their process in terms of their achievements and difficulties.”

Optional courses
Dance

Competency 1: To invent dances

“By the end of Cycle One, the students participate in the steps of the creative process. Their productions are often influenced by emotional interests. Related to the stimuli for creation, their dances are short and simple, and generally made up of elements used alone. The students are able to talk about aspects of their creative experience that are meaningful to them.”

Competency 2:  To interpret dances

“By the end of Cycle One, the students’ interpretations show a certain accuracy in relation to the choreographic content of the short dance chosen. The students respect the structure and execute the appropriate elements of technique with a basic level of control. The expressive nature of their interpretation is often coloured by emotional interests. Students are able to talk about aspects of their interpretation experience that are meaningful to them.”

Competency 3: To appreciate choreographic works, personal productions and those of classmates

“By the end of Cycle One, the students’ appreciation is often influenced by emotional interests. Using the subject-specific vocabulary, the students identify elements of content in the choreographic production or work. Their comments reflect their opinions about what they have noticed and felt. They are able to talk about aspects of their appreciation experience that are meaningful to them.”

 

Elementary Cycle 2
Compulsory Subjects

Languages 

French, language of instruction

Competency 1: To read various texts

“By the end of Cycle Two, students are capable of reading illustrated common and literary texts presented on various media. For texts that represent a reasonable challenge, students understand the explicitly expressed and sometimes implicit elements. They regularly use reading as a tool to accomplish meaningful tasks in several school areas and in various situations. When reacting to various elements of a text, they do so in a relevant and accurate manner. They use different strategies related to reading to better understand and organize information. When reacting to various aspects of a text, they do so in a relevant and accurate manner. In addition to establishing links with their personal experiences, they also make connections with other works they have read, seen or heard of.”

Competency 2: To write various texts

"By the end of Cycle Two, students regularly write a variety of texts in different school subjects and situations. Their texts generally incorporate several ideas ordered in a logical or chronological order within a paragraph or a few short paragraphs that are not necessarily related to each other. They write full and quite varied sentences, which are sometimes linked using common connectors and take into account some syntax and punctuation constraints. In addition to using a correct and varied vocabulary, students spell the most frequently used words correctly and agree the determinant and adjective with the noun and the verb with the subject in simple cases. They also know how to proofread and correct their texts using several strategies and reference tools. Depending on the communication situation, they use regular or cursive script, writing legibly and occasionally using a word processing software.”

Competency 3: To communicate orally

“By the end of Cycle Two, students regularly participate in various forms of verbal communication on a wide variety of topics that are accessible to them. When verbally exploring a subject, they explain their ideas and sometimes ask questions to check or deepen their understanding of the subject. As a general rule, they speak at the right time during discussions. When they share their views, they usually express themselves in a consistent and organized way and their wording is appropriate. In this context, they sometimes clarify or explain matters using accurate and precise vocabulary. Most of the time, they use the right volume, speed and intonation while using the appropriate language register for the situation.”

English as a second language

Competency 1: To interact orally in English

“By the end of Cycle Two, students use the functional language they have acquired in order to participate in exchanges with peers and the teacher (reacting to messages, initiating messages, maintaining interaction). The exchanges stem from any classroom situation. They are short in duration and may be spontaneous or initiated by the teacher. Students are able to correctly use the functional language frequently employed in class, and their pronunciation can be understood by an English speaker. Students apply the compensatory strategies targeted for the cycle autonomously and apply some learning strategies with the teacher’s assistance. With help from peers and the teacher, they make effective use of the visual support and linguistic resources provided.”

Competency 2: To reinvest understanding of oral and written texts

“By the end of Cycle Two, students demonstrate their understanding of various types of texts. Using functional language and words drawn from texts, they identify and briefly describe certain key elements and demonstrate understanding of the overall meaning. They sometimes use contextual cues autonomously. They also apply some learning strategies with the help of peers and the teacher. Students reinvest their understanding by carrying out tasks: they use texts and available resources as sources of ideas and information, compare reality presented in texts with their own and deliver a personalized product.”

Competency 3: To write texts

“By the end of Cycle Two, students write short, well-structured texts to fulfill meaningful goals. They use some compensatory and learning strategies supported by peers and the teacher. Students follow an explicit model and make use of resources provided. They produce a text that is pertinent to the instructions given and apply the language conventions targeted for the task. Although the writing closely resembles the explicit model, students deliver a personalized final product to the intended audience.”

Mathematics, Science and Technology
Mathematics

Competency 1: To solve a situational problem related to Mathematics

“By the end of this cycle, the students solve a situational problem that may involve more than one type of information. They are more careful in choosing the types of representations they will use to highlight the relevant information in the situational problem, and they may also use diagrams. They anticipate the result and work out a solution involving a few steps. They validate the solution (procedure and final answer) and explain it orally or in writing using elaborate mathematical language.”

 

Competency 2: To reason using mathematical concepts and processes

“By the end of this cycle, the students continue developing and applying their own computational processes, but this time they use the four operations. They become familiar with conventional processes for written computations that involve adding and subtracting natural numbers and decimals. They can describe plane figures and solids. They begin to estimate, measure or calculate lengths, surface areas and time. They can produce frieze patterns and tessellations by means of reflections. They can do simulations related to activities involving chance and interpret and draw broken-line graphs. Without really being able to explain why, they can recognize situations in which it is appropriate to use technology.”

Science and Technology

Competency 1: To propose explanations for or solutions to scientific or technological problems
“By the end of this cycle, the students explore problems that require relatively simple and concrete approaches and strategies. They gather information, plan their work and take notes relating to a number of parameters. They validate their approach by taking into account a number of scientific and technological elements. They still find it difficult to distinguish between the scientific and the
technological aspects of a problem.”

Competency 2: To make the most of scientific and technological tools, objects and procedures

“By the end of this cycle, the students use relatively simple and concrete tools, techniques, instruments and procedures, exploiting their basic potential and briefly assessing the results they have obtained. They design rudimentary tools, instruments and techniques and are aware of the most obvious examples of how science and technology have shaped the living conditions of human beings.”

Compétence 3 : Communiquer à l’aide des langages utilisés en science et en technologie.

“By the end of this cycle, the students correctly interpret and convey simple scientific and technological information involving some facets of the language of science and technology (everyday words whose scientific meaning is the same as their everyday meaning, everyday words whose scientific meaning is different from or more precise than their everyday meaning, some specialized terms and expressions as well as simple diagrams, tables and graphs).”

Social Sciences
Geography, History and Citizenship Education

Competency: To construct his/her representation of space, time and society

“By the end of Cycle One, students use the appropriate tools to orient themselves in space and time. They refer to events in everyday life. They describe the characteristics of a group from here or elsewhere, the past or the present. They describe the elements of a place and some similarities, differences and changes. In doing so, they use correct vocabulary.”

Competency 2: To interpret change in a society and its territory

“By the end of Cycle Two, students interpret social and territorial changes. They present these changes in a production. They recognize some changes in the location of a society and its territory in space and at two points in time and identify some social and territorial changes, associate people or events with them and recognize some of their causes and effects. They find traces of these changes in the society and its territory today. They defend their interpretations of the changes to other students. In doing so, they use correct arguments and vocabulary.”

Competency 3: To be open to the diversity of societies and their territories

“By the end of Cycle Two, students present their views of the diversity of societies and their territories. They indicate some differences in the locations of societies and their territories. They identify similarities or differences in the organization of these societies and territories and recognize some causes and effects of these similarities and differences. They indicate some strengths and weaknesses of these types of organization. They compare their views of the diversity of societies and their territories with those of others and defend them. In doing so, they use correct arguments and vocabulary.”

Arts Education
Visual Arts

Competency 1: To produce individual works in the visual arts

“By the end of Cycle One, the students participate in the steps of the creative process. Their productions are often influenced by emotional interests. Related to the stimulus for creation, the work conveys a personal perception of reality. It grows out of spontaneous gestures, an appropriate use of visual arts language and a simple organization of its components. The students are able to talk about aspects of their creative experience that are meaningful to them.”

Competency 2: To produce media works in the visual arts

“By the end of Cycle One, the students participate in the steps of the creative process. Their productions are often influenced by emotional interests. Related to the stimulus for creation, the work conveys a personal view of reality and is addressed to one or more intended viewers. It grows out of spontaneous gestures, an appropriate use of visual arts language and a simple organization of its elements. The students are able to talk about aspects of creating a media work that are meaningful to them.”

Competency 3: To appreciate works of arts, traditional artistic objects, media images, personal productions and those of classmates

“By the end of Cycle One, the students’ appreciation is often influenced by emotional interests. Using the subject-specific vocabulary, they identify elements of content in the production, work of art, traditional artistic object or media image. Their comments reflect their opinions about what they noticed and felt. They are able to talk about aspects of their appreciation experience that are meaningful to them.”

Drama

Competency 1: To invent short scenes

“By the end of Cycle One, the students participate in the steps of the creative process. Their productions are often influenced by emotional interests. Related to the stimulus for creation, the short scene presents a simple story and highlights a few features of a character. It reveals a simple organization of its components. The students are able to talk about aspects of their creative experience that are meaningful to them.”

Competency 2: To interpret short scenes

“By the end of Cycle One, the students interpret through gestures, sounds and words. Their interpretations show a certain accuracy in relation to the selected text. The students respect a few features of a character and demonstrate a basic level of control of performance techniques, styles of theatre, elements of drama and appropriate structures. Finally, the expressive nature of their interpretation is often coloured by emotional interests. They are able to talk about aspects of their interpretation experience that are meaningful to them.”

Competency 3: To appreciate dramatic works, personal productions and those of classmates

“By the end of Cycle One, the students’ appreciation is often influenced by emotional interests. Using the subject-specific vocabulary, they identify elements of content in the production or theatrical work. Their comments reflect their opinions about what they have noticed and felt. They are able to talk about aspects of their appreciation experience that are meaningful to them.”

Personal Development
Ethics and Religious Culture 

Competency 1: To reflect on ethical questions

"By the end of Cycle One, students are able to tackle a situation dealing with the needs of humans and other living beings, as well as the demands associated with interdependence. They can describe a situation by naming some essential elements. They can indicate the responsibilities that human beings have toward other living beings. They can express some elements of their reflection on the ethical question raised by the situation by responding to the teacher's questions. They can find similarities and differences between their perception and that of their classmates. They can name one or two references contained in a point of view. They can identify a value named by the teacher and recognize a norm that guides the way human beings act in a given situation. They are able to give special weight to an option or an action that favours the well-being of living beings by taking their connections of interdependence into account. They can say what they have learned."

Competency 2: To demonstrate an understanding of the phenomenon of religion

“By the end of Cycle One, students are able to name different religious celebrations—celebrations or rituals associated with birth. They can recognize some forms of religious expression related to a celebration. They can understand that there are different ways of celebrating. They can associate a celebration with a religious tradition. They can relate the celebration to certain short stories and key figures. They can associate forms of religious expression with elements in their immediate environment. Through simple situations, they can name behaviours that are appropriate with regard to diversity. They are able to name what they have learned regarding forms of religious expression.”

Competency 3: To engage in dialogue

“By the end of Cycle One, students are able to follow a process and express their ideas in the context of a narration, conversation, discussion and deliberation. They can express their preferences, feelings or ideas about concrete and simple subjects. They can recognize the judgments of preference and prescription in a point of view. They can examine points of view using suggested paths. They respect some of the proposed rules of dialogue. They use the teacher's resources and suggestions to develop a relevant point of view. They can listen to others' points of view and are able to express whether their own view has been modified or consolidated.”

Physical Education and Health

Competency 1: To perform movement skills in different physical activity settings.

“Students identify possible movement skills in light of the instructions given, the goal pursued and the physical environment. They choose movement skills and justify their choices. They perform sequences of locomotor, nonlocomotor and object manipulation skills. They evaluate their process on the basis of their achievements and difficulties”
 

Competency 2: To interact with others in different physical activity settings

“Students plan cooperation strategies with a peer, taking into account the roles to be played, the constraints of the physical environment, and the goal pursued. They explain the ethical rules relevant to the task. They apply the strategies and the ethical rules. With their partner, they evaluate their process in terms of their achievements and difficulties.”

Competency 3: To adopt a healthy, active lifestyle

“Students explain the concept of lifestyle habits and health. They try different types of physical activities, varying their duration and intensity. They evaluate their process in terms of their achievements and difficulties.”

Optional courses
Dance

Competency 1: To invent dances

“By the end of Cycle One, the students participate in the steps of the creative process. Their productions are often influenced by emotional interests. Related to the stimuli for creation, their dances are short and simple, and generally made up of elements used alone. The students are able to talk about aspects of their creative experience that are meaningful to them.”

Competency 2:  To interpret dances.

“By the end of Cycle One, the students’ interpretations show a certain accuracy in relation to the choreographic content of the short dance chosen. The students respect the structure and execute the appropriate elements of technique with a basic level of control. The expressive nature of their interpretation is often coloured by emotional interests. Students are able to talk about aspects of their interpretation experience that are meaningful to them.”

 

Competency 3: To appreciate choreographic works, personal productions and those of classmates

“By the end of Cycle One, the students’ appreciation is often influenced by emotional interests. Using the subject-specific vocabulary, the students identify elements of content in the choreographic production or work. Their comments reflect their opinions about what they have noticed and felt. They are able to talk about aspects of their appreciation experience that are meaningful to them.”

 

Elementary Cycle 2
Compulsory Subjects
Languages
French, language of instruction

Competency 1: To read various texts

“By the end of Cycle Two, students are capable of reading illustrated common and literary texts presented on various media. For texts that represent a reasonable challenge, students understand the explicitly expressed and sometimes implicit elements. They regularly use reading as a tool to accomplish meaningful tasks in several school areas and in various situations. When reacting to various elements of a text, they do so in a relevant and accurate manner. They use different strategies related to reading to better understand and organize information. When reacting to various aspects of a text, they do so in a relevant and accurate manner. In addition to establishing links with their personal experiences, they also make connections with other works they have read, seen or heard of.”

 

Competency 2: To write various texts

"By the end of Cycle Two, students regularly write a variety of texts in different school subjects and situations. Their texts generally incorporate several ideas ordered in a logical or chronological order within a paragraph or a few short paragraphs that are not necessarily related to each other. They write full and quite varied sentences, which are sometimes linked using common connectors and take into account some syntax and punctuation constraints. In addition to using a correct and varied vocabulary, students spell the most frequently used words correctly and agree the determinant and adjective with the noun and the verb with the subject in simple cases. They also know how to proofread and correct their texts using several strategies and reference tools. Depending on the communication situation, they use regular or cursive script, writing legibly and occasionally using a word processing software.”

 

Competency 3: To communicate orally

“By the end of Cycle Two, students regularly participate in various forms of verbal communication on a wide variety of topics that are accessible to them. When verbally exploring a subject, they explain their ideas and sometimes ask questions to check or deepen their understanding of the subject. As a general rule, they speak at the right time during discussions. When they share their views, they usually express themselves in a consistent and organized way and their wording is appropriate. In this context, they sometimes clarify or explain matters using accurate and precise vocabulary. Most of the time, they use the right volume, speed and intonation while using the appropriate language register for the situation.”

English as a second language

Competency 1: To interact orally in English

“By the end of Cycle Two, students use the functional language they have acquired in order to participate in exchanges with peers and the teacher (reacting to messages, initiating messages, maintaining interaction). The exchanges stem from any classroom situation. They are short in duration and may be spontaneous or initiated by the teacher. Students are able to correctly use the functional language frequently employed in class, and their pronunciation can be understood by an English speaker. Students apply the compensatory strategies targeted for the cycle autonomously and apply some learning strategies with the teacher’s assistance. With help from peers and the teacher, they make effective use of the visual support and linguistic resources provided.”

Competency 2: To reinvest understanding of oral and written texts

“By the end of Cycle Two, students demonstrate their understanding of various types of texts. Using functional language and words drawn from texts, they identify and briefly describe certain key elements and demonstrate understanding of the overall meaning. They sometimes use contextual cues autonomously. They also apply some learning strategies with the help of peers and the teacher. Students reinvest their understanding by carrying out tasks: they use texts and available resources as sources of ideas and information, compare reality presented in texts with their own and deliver a personalized product.”

Competency 3: To write texts

“By the end of Cycle Two, students write short, well-structured texts to fulfill meaningful goals. They use some compensatory and learning strategies supported by peers and the teacher. Students follow an explicit model and make use of resources provided. They produce a text that is pertinent to the instructions given and apply the language conventions targeted for the task. Although the writing closely resembles the explicit model, students deliver a personalized final product to the intended audience.”

Mathematics, Science and Technology
Mathematics

Competency 1: To solve a situational problem related to Mathematics“By the end of this cycle, the students solve a situational problem that may involve more than one type of information. They are more careful in choosing the types of representations they will use to highlight the relevant information in the situational problem, and they may also use diagrams. They anticipate the result and work out a solution involving a few steps. They validate the solution (procedure and final answer) and explain it orally or in writing using elaborate mathematical language.”

Competency 2: To reason using mathematical concepts and processes

“By the end of this cycle, the students continue developing and applying their own computational processes, but this time they use the four operations. They become familiar with conventional processes for written computations that involve adding and subtracting natural numbers and decimals. They can describe plane figures and solids. They begin to estimate, measure or calculate lengths, surface areas and time. They can produce frieze patterns and tessellations by means of reflections. They can do simulations related to activities involving chance and interpret and draw broken-line graphs. Without really being able to explain why, they can recognize situations in which it is appropriate to use technology.”

Science and Technology

Competency 1: To propose explanations for or solutions to scientific or technological problems

“By the end of this cycle, the students explore problems that require relatively simple and concrete approaches and strategies. They gather information, plan their work and take notes relating to a number of parameters. They validate their approach by taking into account a number of scientific and technological elements. They still find it difficult to distinguish between the scientific and the
technological aspects of a problem.”

Competency 2: To make the most of scientific and technological tools, objects and procedures

“By the end of this cycle, the students use relatively simple and concrete tools, techniques, instruments and procedures, exploiting their basic potential and briefly assessing the results they have obtained. They design rudimentary tools, instruments and techniques and are aware of the most obvious examples of how science and technology have shaped the living conditions of human beings.”

Competency 3: To communicate in the languages used in Science and Technology

“By the end of this cycle, the students correctly interpret and convey simple scientific and technological information involving some facets of the language of science and technology (everyday words whose scientific meaning is the same as their everyday meaning, everyday words whose scientific meaning is different from or more precise than their everyday meaning, some specialized terms and expressions as well as simple diagrams, tables and graphs).”

Social Sciences
Geography, History and Citizenship Education

Competency 1: To understand the organization of a society in its territory

“At the end of Cycle Two, on the basis of phenomena of the present, students indicate traces of a past society in our society and territory. They recognize elements of the organization of that society in its territory. They present their understanding of this organization in a production. They locate the society and its territory, indicate adaptations of the society to the territory it occupies and changes it has made to the territory. They associate people or events with social and territorial organization. In doing so, they use correct vocabulary.”

Competency 2: To interpret change in a society and its territory

“By the end of Cycle Two, students interpret social and territorial changes. They present these changes in a production. They recognize some changes in the location of a society and its territory in space and at two points in time and identify some social and territorial changes, associate people or events with them and recognize some of their causes and effects. They find traces of these changes in the society and its territory today. They defend their interpretations of the changes to other students. In doing so, they use correct arguments and vocabulary.”
 

Competency 3: To be open to the diversity of societies and their territories
“By the end of Cycle Two, students present their views of the diversity of societies and their territories. They indicate some differences in the locations of societies and their territories. They identify similarities or differences in the organization of these societies and territories and recognize some causes and effects of these similarities and differences. They indicate some strengths and weaknesses of these types of organization. They compare their views of the diversity of societies and their territories with those of others and defend them. In doing so, they use correct arguments and vocabulary.”

Arts Education
Visual Arts

Competency 1: To produce individual works in the visual arts

“By the end of Cycle Two, the students take into consideration the steps of the creative process. Their productions are often influenced by emotional and social interests. Related to the stimulus for creation, the work conveys a personal perception of reality. It grows out of spontaneous and precise gestures, an appropriate use of visual arts language and a coherent organization of its components. The students describe their creative experience and identify what they have learned from it.”
 

Competency 2: To produce media works in the visual arts

“By the end of Cycle Two, the students take into account the steps of the creative process. Their productions are often influenced by emotional and social interests. Related to the stimulus for creation, the work conveys a personal perception of reality, contains a message and is intended for one or more viewers. It grows out of spontaneous and precise gestures, an appropriate use of visual arts language and a coherent organization of its elements. The students describe their visual arts experience and identify what they have learned from it.”

 

Competency 3: To appreciate works of art, traditional artistic objects, media images, personal productions and those of classmates

“By the end of Cycle Two, the students’ appreciation is often influenced by emotional and social interests. Making appropriate use of the subject-specific vocabulary, they describe the content of the production or work of art, traditional artistic object or media image. Their comments contain visual arts, personal and sometimes sociocultural considerations, which are related to the appreciation criteria and which support the opinions they have formed. They describe their appreciation experience and identify what they have learned.”

Drama

Competency 1: To invent short scenes

“By the end of Cycle One, the students participate in the steps of the creative process. Their productions are often influenced by emotional interests. Related to the stimulus for creation, the work conveys a personal perception of reality. It grows out of spontaneous gestures, an appropriate use of visual arts language and a simple organization of its components. The students are able to talk about aspects of their creative experience that are meaningful to them.”
 

Competency 2: To produce media works in the visual arts

“By the end of Cycle One, the students participate in the steps of the creative process. Their productions are often influenced by emotional interests. Related to the stimulus for creation, the work conveys a personal view of reality and is addressed to one or more intended viewers. It grows out of spontaneous gestures, an appropriate use of visual arts language and a simple organization of its elements. The students are able to talk about aspects of creating a media work that are meaningful to them.”
 

Competency 3: To appreciate works of arts, traditional artistic objects, media images, personal productions and those of classmates

“By the end of Cycle One, the students’ appreciation is often influenced by emotional interests. Using the subject-specific vocabulary, they identify elements of content in the production, work of art, traditional artistic object or media image. Their comments reflect their opinions about what they noticed and felt. They are able to talk about aspects of their appreciation experience that are meaningful to them.”

Personal Development
 Ethics and Religious Culture

Competency 1: To reflect on ethical questions

“By the end of Cycle Two, students are able to tackle a situation dealing with interpersonal relationships and demands associated with group life. They can describe a situation by naming the essential elements. They can identify the tensions and conflicting values present in different points of view. They can attribute points of view to the individuals concerned with regard to the situation. With the teacher's help, they can formulate certain ethical questions raised by the situation and recognize some of the references present in different points of view. They can express how these references are important for the individuals concerned. They can compare their perception with that of their classmates. They can name behaviours or attitudes that contribute to or detract from group life. They can recognize their needs and name their responsibilities with regard to others. They can consider certain options or possible actions and recognize the impact on themselves and others. They are able to give special weight to actions that favour group life in terms of contributing to community life. They can establish connections with similar situations. They are able to reflect on their learning and their process.”

Competency 2: To demonstrate an understanding of the phenomenon of religion

“By the end of Cycle Two, students are able to deal with a situation involving forms of religious expression. They can give a brief description of community celebrations, objects, symbols, places of worship and rites. They can understand the meaning of certain forms of religious expression. They can identify such forms of expression in their environment and recognize what they have in common and what distinguishes them. They can make connections between sacred writings, spiritual guides and their traditions. They can make some connections between various forms of religious expression and elements in the social and cultural environment from here and elsewhere in the world. They can name various ways of thinking, being or acting, as well as behaviours that are appropriate with regard to diversity. They can reflect on their learning and their process.”

Competency 3: To engage in dialogue“​​​​​​

​By the end of Cycle Two, students are able to follow a process and organize their ideas in the context of a narration, conversation, discussion, deliberation and interview. They can examine their preferences, perceptions, feelings or ideas regarding concrete and simple subjects. They can recognize the judgments of preference, prescription and reality in a point of view. They can examine points of view using relevant questions. They respect the rules of dialogue that have been proposed to them. They use some resources and vocabulary that are specific to the subject of the dialogue in order to develop a point of view that includes relevant elements. They can listen to others' points of view and are able to explain whether their own view has been modified or consolidated.

Physical Education and Health

Competency 1: To perform movement skills in different physical activity settings

“Students identify possible movement skills taking into account their capacity to apply the principles of balance and coordination. They choose movement skills and justify their choices. They perform movement sequences and simultaneous locomotor, nonlocomotor, and object and implement manipulation skills. They evaluate their process and identify desirable improvements or elements that are worth keeping with a view to applying their learnings in the same activity.”
 

Competency 2: To interact with others in different physical activity settings

“Students plan cooperation and opposition strategies with one or more peers, taking into account their own achievements and difficulties and those of their partner(s). They explain the ethical rules relevant to the task. They apply the strategies and the ethical rules. They verbally or non-verbally communicate a message as called for by the situation. They evaluate their process and participate in efforts to find effective strategies. They readjust their plan of action based on this evaluation.”
 

Competency 3: To adopt a healthy, active lifestyle

“Students identify different strategies they can use to change their lifestyle habits. They recognize which of their habits are conducive to health and well-being and which are detrimental. With the teacher’s support, they choose a physical activity and plan how they will engage in this activity on a regular basis. They also plan how they will change another of their lifestyle habits. They interpret their results and identify desirable improvements or elements that are worth keeping.”

Optional courses
Dance

Competency 1: to invent dances

“By the end of Cycle Two, the students take into consideration the steps of the creative process. Their productions are often influenced by emotional and social interests, and they reflect the main aspects of the stimulus for creation. Their dances vary in length, are coherently organized, and generally combine elements. The students describe their creative experience and identify what they have learned from it.”

Competency 2: To interpret dances

“By the end of Cycle Two, the students’ interpretations are in keeping with the choreographic content of the chosen piece, which is now longer. The students respect the structure of the piece, execute the appropriate elements of technique with more control, use performance aids, where appropriate, and take into account some of the rules of group movements. In their performances, the students respond on an emotional level to the main expressive elements of the dance. They describe their interpretation experience and identify what they have learned from it.”
 

Competency 3: To appreciate geographic works, personal productions and those of classmates

“By the end of Cycle Two, the students’ appreciation is often influenced by emotional and social interests. Making appropriate use of subject-specific vocabulary, they describe the content of the production or dance work. Their comments contain dance, personal and sometimes sociocultural considerations, which are related to the appreciation criteria and which support the opinions they have formed. They describe their appreciation experience and identify what they have learned.”

 

Teaching Methods

In an effort to accommodate a greater variety of learning styles, the teaching methods advocated by CADO are diverse. We strive to offer a proactive education to meet the needs of our students.

  • Differentiated instruction
  • Modelling
  • Lecturing
  • Project-based learning
  • Explicit teaching

We enjoy teaching students through projects. Below is a list of interesting activities that have been carried out at CADO in recent years :

  • Afternoon kiosk : It is an interdisciplinary project (geography, history, ethics and religious culture, French and English) in which students were required to research a given country and later display their findings in the form of a poster and bilingual pamphlet at the gymnasium.
  • Creation of a family tree : As part of the Histoire à la citoyenneté (History of Citizenship) course, students were asked to research and relate their family history to that of Quebec.
  • Sports presenter conference : As part of the French program, a presenter spoke to students about his job and they were then asked to write a newspaper report.
  • Conferences of people from different professional backgrounds : As part of the Personal Orientation Project, several conferences were held to help students learn more about professional bodies they were interested in.
  • Creation of a tag game for primary school children : As part of Physical Education, secondary school students were asked to invent a new tag game and introduce it to primary school children who would then test it.
  • Singer conference : Following a lecture by a singer in French class, students could build on their learning to create the lyrics of a song.
  • Soldier and police officer conference : As part of the Contemporary World course, a soldier and a police officer shared their respective experiences in Afghanistan and Haiti.
  • Career Day : Each year, the CEGEPs, professional centres and Outaouais universities present their programs to the school's students.
  • Reading to the youngest : A new project is underway in which secondary school students will read stories to preschool and lower grade primary school pupils. We will then take the project a step further by having students write their own stories that primary school students will then illustrate.

Your child will be in a:

Healthy
Safe
Pleasant environment

We remain at your disposal to provide you with further information.